What is an Early Adopter?

Early Adopters are those individuals who are the first to embrace a new practice.

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s Office of Early Learning (OEL) is partnering with several districts around the state who will serve as NC K-3 Formative Assessment Process Early Adopters. These districts will serve as a model for others, paving the way for innovation throughout the state.
Watch the video below for FAQ about the Early Adoption process (approx 13 min).
To download a transcript of this video, click here.




COMPONENT


DESCRIPTION OF THE EARLY ADOPTER SUPPORT MODEL COMPONENTS

Early Adopter District Implementation Team (DIT)


Early Adopters and their DITs are the Center of it All

Early Adopter DITs are part of the linked teaming structure (NIRN, http://implementation.fpg.unc.edu/module-1/implementation-teams ) and include a cabinet-level decision maker and various stakeholders from within an early adopter district that represent all roles relevant to the K-3 Formative Assessment Process. DITs are directly supported by their Regional Implementation Team (RIT) to develop their knowledge of implementation practices and the K-3 Formative Assessment Process through systems coaching. DITs support Building Implementation Teams (BITs) within their district by providing professional development, coaching, and by engaging in problem solving.

Regional Implementation Team (RIT) Systems Coaching


Ongoing RIT Systems Coaching Supports Change

Systems coaching is the effort of implementation specialists to support change at the systems level. Change at the systems level includes assisting in the removal of barriers to allow practitioners to engage with a new innovation, in this case the K-3 Formative Assessment Process. Our systems coaching will be informed by the work of Knotek (2017) who defines coaching at the systems level as a process of “…establishing a collaborative relationship characterized by reciprocal leadership in order to develop implementation capacity, fidelity and sustainability.” Further, Knotek (2017) describes five critical components for systems coaching which include: (1) Time, Structure, and Accountability; (2) Working Alliance; (3) Problem-Solving; (4) Professional Development; and (5) Organizational Change (Dewey, Young & D’Ardenne, 2017).
  • Systems coaching will occur primarily at meetings with DITs occurring approximately once a month, and may also occur during small group discussion at Community of Practice meetings and during targeted support efforts with select districts. The systems coaching at the DIT level will involve the RIT helping the DIT develop implementation structures such as a feedback loop, a communication plan, professional development within the district, and a model of embedded coaching support for teachers. While providing systems coaching, the RIT will gather implementation data from the DIT and engage in a Decision Support Data System for continuous problem solving and removal of barriers (NIRN, http://nirn.fpg.unc.edu/learn-implementation/implementation-drivers/dss).

State Support from the Implementation Design Team (IDT)


State Support Creates a Practice to Policy Feedback Loop Connecting the Work of the Teams with Data

IDT support is data-driven work focused on creating resources to support RITs and DITs in their implementation efforts. Implementation data in the form of coaching notes, plus/delta information from BITs, District Capacity Assessments (DCA), and formative assessment reports gathered from the online platform are used to inform the work of the IDT. Members of all state-level teams (including the Steering Committee and all RITs) participate in the work of the IDT and its workgroups.

Community of Practice (CoP)


The Community of Practice Creates a Place to Network for Early Adopters

The Community of Practice includes a group of practitioners who share a common interest or concern and come together to learn from one another (Cambridge, Kaplan & Suter, 2005). Communities of Practice share: a domain of interest (in this case, the K-3 Formative Assessment Process); a community engaged in joint activities to share information and learn from one another; and engagement in the practice itself (Wenger-Traynor, 2015). The Early Adopter Community of Practice for the K-3 Formative Assessment Process allows members of District Implementation Teams to share what they are doing to support the implementation of the K-3 FAP and to learn what others are doing.

Cross Early Adopter (EA) Collaboration


Cross Early Adopter Collaboration Helps Target Common Needs

Regional consultants and their RITs collaborate with other RITs to address specific district needs identified through implementation data. Sources of implementation data include coaching notes, plus/delta information from BITs, District Capacity Assessments (DCA), and formative assessment reports gathered from the online platform. Implementation data is compiled and analyzed by the IDT Research & Evaluation workgroup and used to identify common district needs, which can be addressed through Cross-RIT Collaboration. RITs may collaborate to create resources, hold virtual meetings, or leverage other strategies to meet the identified needs.



K-3 RESOURCES: Top Picks for Early Adopters!

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ESTABLISH YOUR IMPLEMENTATION FEEDBACK LOOP


Building Team Meeting Summary Form - Maintaining the feedback loop between Building Implementation Teams and District Implementation Teams is key to a successful communication protocol. Several districts are using the Building Team Meeting Summary Form (or Glows/Grows). Its format, highlighting "Glows," or successes, and "Grows," or areas for improvement, was co-created by the Chatham County District Implementation Team.

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JIGSAW to BUILD FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PROCESS CAPACITY


NC 5 Critical Component Jigsaw Activity - this activity involves using the NC 5 Critical Component handout and this JIGSAW handout and inviting participants to follow the directions on the handout to get to know NC 5 Critical Components.

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SELF-REFLECT to BUILD FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PROCESS CAPACITY


This self-reflection tool is important for educators as they begin implementation of the formative assessment process. It helps them to know the expected implementation of the Five Critical Components and uses I can statements to support reflection and professional goal-setting.

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MATCH CRITICAL COMPONENTS to BUILD FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT PROCESS CAPACITY


This hands-on matching activity is designed for participants to review the five Critical Components of the NC K-3 Formative Assessment Process. Participants will sequence the Critical Components in the correct order and then match each component to its definition. Note: There is not a first step, second step sequence that results in finishing the process with a final step, but rather an ongoing process represented by the circular graphic.

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USE QUICK GUIDES to BUILD UNDERSTANDING OF K-3 CONSTRUCTS


These Quick Guides will support the understanding and use of the NC K-3 Formative Assessment Process Construct Progressions for K-3. The full progressions can be found in this K-3 Construct Progressions and Situations Book.

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SEQUENCE SKILL STEPS to BUILD UNDERSTANDING OF K-3 CONSTRUCTS

In this activity, "players" are given a set of steps for a given construct, out of order. The object is to correctly order the steps within each construct. Players can check their thinking using the answer key provided for each construct. This can be completed with small groups with all or selected constructs to build understanding. Construct cards and answer keys are provided below.

Facilitation Notes: Notes for the Facilitator

Construct Cards and Answer Keys:

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PARTNER WITH FAMILIES

Use these resources to share information about the NC K-3 Formative Assessment process with families and to gather their feedback.